ON THE HORIZON: Michigan Lead Standards Expected to Toughen Up

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ON THE HORIZON: Michigan Lead Standards Expected to Toughen Up

Governor Snyder announced his plan to change the current lead standards for drinking water. Currently, Michigan follows the federal government’s “action level” of lead toxicity: 15 parts per billion. Through administrative rule-making, Snyder plans to lower the action level to 10ppb by 2020. Upon completion, Michigan will have the toughest lead standards in the nation.

Details on how the stricter standards will be phased in are not yet available. It is possible that Michigan will gradually reduce the action level until it reaches 10ppb in 2020.

Additional administrative rules being proposed include:
• Full-System Inventories by public water systems to identify materials, including lead service lines.
• Water Systems will be required to have an advisory council, which will include citizen members

Proposed initiatives that will require approval by Michigan Legislature include:
• Strengthening water sampling methods
• Public disclosure will be required for test results
• Filters will be required on drinking 

fountains in state-licensed facilities for children and seniors
• Discontinuing the partial replacement of lead service pipes
• Property owners will be required to disclose any plumbing known to contain lead

“Upon completion, Michigan will have the toughest lead standards in the nation.”

ASTI will continue to perform lead testing in drinking water according to current standards. However, in circumstances where test results exceed proposed limits, we will address our concerns with the client. We feel that it is best to be proactive with the proposed, lower standards. In doing so, our clients will feel less of an impact by the rule changes once they’re enacted.

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P.O. Box 2160, Brighton, Michigan, 48116-2160.  For a free subscription call 800.395.ASTI or visit www.asti-env.com


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